Anne Neelywater
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Mopang: Recent Paintings
Lohin Geduld Gallery, 531 West 25th Street, New York, NY
September 7 – October 8, 2011

Catalog with essay by Jonathan Franzen

Mopang Cahoosic
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Turlach Turlough Kettle Hole
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Pond Park Tidal
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Riverside Waterborne
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Off Island Levee
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Aglow Bedrock
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Urban Marsh
Moons Over Mopang
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Waterlines Offshore
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Plain Perseids


"Kettle Hole (2010–11) could be a forest under a night sky beyond a field of ice, or a bed of lake flora over another bed of limestone. Packets of color, formed by the knifing of white onto a fiendishly complicated background, cross the chilly scene. They look like coded messages, parcels en route to points east and west of the painting. The speeding, abstracted traffic brings Julie Mehretu to mind, though Neely does a more convincing job cohering the flurry of marks into a painting...

Neely never allows the sentiment behind a work to turn into sentiment in the work. She has felt the problem with great depth, yet at no expense to her artistry. Thus she can produce paintings like Tidal (2010), a fiery Divisionist landscape under a sweeping orange sky. Its summery dots could be joyful. Its blue mass in the distance could be a scorched, disappearing lake. The painting understates the message, keeping within the borders of art, where it excels."
—Franklin Einspruch, artcritical.com, October 6, 2011


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Where There's Water
Lohin Geduld Gallery, 531 West 25th Street, New York, NY
March/April 2009

Where There's Water Joker
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Inward Lakes Surprise
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Mudflat Navigation
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A Front
Messenger


"Though many of the 14 oil-on-linen paintings (all 2008 or '09) in "Where There's Water," Anne Neely's third solo exhibition at Lohin Geduld, pay homage to the lakes, tidal inlets and aquifers surrounding her Maine studio, their real subject is paint and the improvisational gusto of its handling. Neely reveals a visceral connection to her subject matter by way of a process that echoes nature's dynamism, a discourse not dissimilar to that of her contemporary, Joan Snyder."
— Elisa Decker, Art in America, September 2009